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Seventy-Third Ohio Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


LET'S GET TO THE POINT! Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 73rd Ohio Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 15 [S# 15]
MAY 8, 1862.-- Engagement near McDowell (Bull Pasture Mountain), Va.
NO. 4--Report of Brig. Gen. Robert H. Milroy, U. S. Army, commanding brigade.

...

        Upon the next morning (8th instant) the enemy was seen upon the Bull Pasture Mountain, about 1 miles distant from McDowell, on my right and front. I commenced shelling them and sent out parties of skirmishers to endeavor to ascertain their numbers. At about 10 a.m. your brigade arrived. Desultory firing of a section of Hyman's battery and occasional skirmishing engaged the attention of the enemy during the morning. Major Long, of the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with a party of skirmishers, rendered a good service by his efforts in ascertaining the position of the enemy. In the afternoon, at about 3 o'clock, being informed by Capt. George R. Latham, of Second West Virginia Volunteer infantry, who, with his company, was engaged in skirmishing, that the rebels were endeavoring to plant a battery upon the mountain which would command our whole encampment, with your permission I made a reconnaissance for the purpose of obtaining accurate information of their strength and position. For this purpose the following troops were placed at my disposal: The Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Thirty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Third West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. These regiments were by no means full, various companies of each being detailed for special duty. The number of privates, non-commissioned officers, and officers actually engaged are reported to me as follows:

25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry 469
75th Ohio Volunteer Infantry 444
32d Ohio Volunteer Infantry 416
3d West Virginia Volunteer Infantry 439

Total 1,768

...

                                                                                        R. H. MILROY,
                                                                                                Brigadier-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No. 11.--Report of Col. William P. Richardson, Twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations August 21-31.

...

        On the morning of the 23d we received orders to march, and after some considerable delay we started on our return to the Springs. We arrived in the neighborhood of the Springs after sundown. A sharp skirmish occurred on our left, which was kept up until some time after dark. I was informed that it was Milroy's brigade that was engaged.
        On the morning of the 24th my regiment and the Seventy-third Ohio, and four pieces of De Beck's battery, under the command of Colonel Smith, of the Seventy-third Ohio, was sent on a reconnaissance, and after advancing some 2 miles it was ascertained that the rebels had recrossed the river and had some batteries in position on the opposite side. They were opened upon by our battery, but did not reply to us. Shortly afterward we were joined by the brigade, and marched to Waterloo Bridge and encamped for the night. We remained in the neighborhood of Waterloo Bridge all day of the 25th. Nothing of importance occurred except that all day large bodies of rebel troops could be seen passing north and west at a distance of some 4 or 5 miles from the river, and about sundown it was said that they had crossed above us in force.

...

                                                                                        WM. P. RICHARDSON,
                                                                                                Colonel Twenty-fifth Regiment O. V. Infantry.

                                                                                        Col. N. C. McLEAN,
                                                                                                Comdg. Second Brigade, First Division.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No.14.--Report of Maj. Robert Reily, Seventy-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations August 8-September 2.

...

        Incamped near New York [Rhode Island?] battery, Captain Monroe, on the night of the 29th. Placed the regiment on picket in front of Monroe's battery at l0 o'clock p.m. Remained there until 6 o'clock a.m. 30th instant. 30th. Remained below the crest of the hill in a state of rest up to about 3 o'clock p.m. of this day, at which time the regiment, together with other regiments of the Second Brigade, was ordered forward, as I have since learned, for the purpose of supporting General Reynolds, then about to engage in action with the enemy upon our left. To do this we marched forward and took position upon a hill immediately, if I mistake not, southeast of our position. This was afterward discovered to be the wrong position, and we were then marched to another position still farther south. Between changing position and marching nearly one hour was consumed in gaining the point of action. At about 4 o'clock p.m. we engaged with quite a large body of the enemy to our right and front. Our brigade, aided by [De Beck's] battery, Seventy-third Ohio, Col. Orland Smith, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Richardson, on our left, and shortly after the engagement commenced the Fifty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Lee, double-quicked into position on our right. The engagement at once became animated. Our whole line entered into it with spirit, doing good and effective work, our men firing steadily, with coolness and precision, measuring with great accuracy the distance from the enemy and firing accordingly. The battery also did unmistakable execution. It was not long before we were rejoiced in seeing that tremor in the enemy's ranks which is the sure precursor of a rout. Our men were becoming elated with their success and the hesitation of the enemy and of their falling back.

...

                                                                                        ROBT. REILY,
                                                                                                Major, Comdg. Seventy-fifth Ohio Vol. Infantry.

                                                                                        Col. N. C. McLEAN,
                                                                                                Comdg. Second Brigade, First Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 250. -- Report of Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr,
U.S. Army, commanding Second Division.

...

        July 3.--During this day the battle raged principally on the right and left wings of our army; my division, occupying, with slight changes, the same position as the day before, was not attacked.
        At 2.30 o'clock the enemy again opened a terrific artillery fire upon our hill, which lasted until 4 p.m.
        In regard to our loss, I would respectfully refer to the report previously forwarded. The First Brigade lost heavily; the Second Brigade had during the last two days over 300 men killed and wounded, principally of the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers, by the enemy's sharpshooters, who fired from several buildings of the town at a great distance but with remarkable accuracy.
        The division behaved gallantly, repelling every attack of the enemy, and standing unmoved under the heavy artillery fire of the last two battle days.
        The commanders of my two brigades--Col. Orland Smith, Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers, and Col. Charles R. Coster, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers--have assisted me very materially, both executing my orders with zeal, and exposing themselves freely. They have shown themselves able and gallant soldiers.

...

                                                                                        A. VON STEINWEHR,
                                                                                                Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

                                                                                        Maj. Gen. O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                                                Commanding Eleventh Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/1 [S# 54]
OCTOBER 26-29, 1863.--Reopening of the Tennessee River ...
No. 12. --Report of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, U. S. Army, commanding Eleventh and Twelfth Army Corps, with congratulatory orders.

...

        Directions were immediately given for one of the brigades en route to Geary (Tyndale's) to be detached and assault the enemy in the hills on the left, and for the other brigade to push on as ordered Meanwhile, Howard's First Division, under Steinwehr, came up, when it was discovered that the hill to the rear of Schurz's division was also occupied by the enemy in force, and Smith's brigade, of this division, was ordered to carry it with the bayonet. This skeleton, but brave brigade, charged up the mountain, almost inaccessible by daylight, under a heavy fire, without returning it, and drove three times their number from behind hastily thrown up intrenchments, capturing prisoners, and scattering the enemy in all directions. No troops ever rendered more brilliant service. The name of their valiant commander is Col. Orland Smith, of the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers. Tyndale, encountering less resistance, had also made himself master of the enemy's position in his front.

...

                                                                                        JOSEPH HOOKER,
                                                                                                Major-General, Commanding.

                                                                                        Lieut. Col. C. GODDARD,
                                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/1 [S# 54]
OCTOBER 26-29, 1863.--Reopening of the Tennessee River ...
No. 19. --Report of Col. James Wood, jr., One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry.

...

        On arriving at our place of destination this regiment, with the brigade, encamped for the night. About 1 o'clock of the morning of the 29th ultimo, I was awakened by skirmish firing, which seemed to be a short distance back on the road over which we had marched. The firing rapidly increased in intensity, and the roar of artillery soon mingling with it, admonished us that some part of our forces were engaged with the enemy. The regiment was immediately ordered to fall in under arms, and to march in direction of the conflict. It was soon ascertained that the firing was occasioned by an attack made by the enemy upon the command of Brigadier-General Geary, of the Twelfth Corps, who had been following us from Bridgeport, and was a few hours in our rear. His command, consisting of a part of his division, had encamped for the night at a place called Wauhatchie, about 3 miles from the position occupied by the Eleventh Corps. General Howard ordered his command to march at once to the aid of General Geary. This regiment, at a double-quick, took up the line of march in rear of the brigade, being preceded by the Seventy-third Ohio, Thirty-third Massachusetts, and Fifty-fifth Ohio. When about 1 miles from camp it was ascertained that the enemy occupied the crest of a hill, at the foot of which the road on which we were marching passed, and it was regarded important to dislodge him. Col. O. Smith, commanding the brigade, was ordered to do it. Preparatory to executing the movement, the brigade was halted in the road. Colonel Smith sent forward the Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts, and directed them to charge the hill and drive the enemy therefrom.
        In the meantime, I was ordered by Brigadier-General Steinwehr, division commander, to march my regiment by file to the left and form line of battle west of and perpendicular to the road on which we had been halted. This was at the foot of another hill, about 200 yards north of the one occupied by the enemy, and similar in appearance to it and from which it was separated by a gap or pass. When I had completed the movement ordered, I was directed to send two companies to skirmish up the hill at the foot of which our line of battle was formed, to ascertain if it was occupied by the enemy. I immediately detached Companies H and K from the left of my left wing to execute the movement, and placed the force in command of Captain Eldredge, Company K. The Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty.-third Massachusetts being hard pressed by the enemy on the hill which they had been ordered to charge, my regiment was ordered to their support. I marched to the base of the same hill, halted, and formed line of battle facing it. My center was opposite the highest crest of the hill. Although it was a bright moonlight night, neither the height of the hill nor the obstacles to be encountered could be seen. I was ordered to charge in line of battle to the top of the hill, drive off the enemy, and form a junction with the Thirty-third Massachusetts on my right. It should be borne in mind that the two companies detached as skirmishers had not at this time rejoined the regiment.
        I gave the command "forward," when the regiment advanced in line of battle at as quick a pace as the steep ascent of the hill would permit. Moved steadily and firmly forward under a brisk and constant fire from the enemy, reached and crowned the crest of the hill, drove off the enemy, and took possession. Not a shot was fired by my men until the crest was gained, when one volley was discharged at the retreating enemy. At the time the charge was made the enemy was engaged in throwing up a line of rifle-pits. We captured his intrenching tools. Having gained and occupied the crest of the hill, I deployed one company to the front as skirmishers, moved by the right flank, and formed a connection with the Thirty-third Massachusetts, which regiment had preceded me, charging up the hill on my right, and was vigorously engaged with the enemy when I reached the crest. The victory was complete. The crest of the hill is not more than 6 yards in width, from which there is a rapid descent into a valley on the other side. Down this declivity the enemy precipitately fled in the utmost confusion. He staggered under the intrepid charges and deadly blows delivered to him by the braves of the Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts. His discomfiture was made complete by the vigorous and splendid charge of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers. The ground over which he retreated was strewn with rifles, swords, hats, caps, and haversacks. As daylight opened upon us, we were all astonished at the audacity of our charge and astounded at our success. The hill is over 200 feet perpendicular height, and the distance from the road where I formed line of battle to the crest of the hill is 180 yards.

...

                                                                                        JAMES WOOD, JR.,
                                                                                                Colonel, Commanding.

                                                                                        Capt. B. F. STONE,
                                                                                                Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 91.--Report of Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U.S. Army, commanding Eleventh Army Corps, including march to the relief of Knoxville, with complimentary orders.

...

        At 9 a.m. of the 24th, General Steinwehr, by my direction, moved the Seventy-third Ohio Regiment across the Citico near its mouth, which, deploying nearly at right angles to the general line, handsomely cleared our immediate front as far as the East Tennessee railroad. As there was difficulty in recrossing the creek, the regiment was halted in this position and served as a cover to a movement that shortly took place.

...

        My chief of scouts and road engineer, E. H. Kirlin, rendered valuable service. Lieutenant-Colonel Long, Seventy-third Ohio, in the different towns through which we passed, acting as provost-marshal, was untiring in his exertions to preserve order.
        Herewith you will find a nominal list(*) of the killed and wounded in this corps at the battle of Chattanooga, and a map(+) of the positions.
        Respectfully,

                                                                                        O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                                                Major-General.

                                                                                        Capt. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]
Ops. in Kentucky, Southwest Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and North Georgia.--Jan. 1-April 30, 1864.
No. 2. --Itinerary of the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U.S. Army, January 1-April 30.(*)

...

                                                                                        ELEVENTH ARMY CORPS.
                                                                                                JANUARY.

        Second Division, commanded by Col. Adolphus Buschbeck, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry.
        The division has remained in camp during the past month; has, besides usual guard details, furnished large working parties on military roads and railroad. The following regiments re-enlisted as veteran volunteers and left the command to go to their respective States on recruiting service: January 4, the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with 29 officers and 477 men. January 11, the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with 27 officers and 423 men; the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, with 15 officers and 164 men. From these regiments there remained here the following numbers of men, who either were debarred the privilege of re-en-listing by the limited term of their previous service or were unwilling to re-enlist: From the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 185 men, transferred to the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; from the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 118 men, and from the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 16 men, in all 134 men who were transferred to the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers.

...

        Second Division, commanded by Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr.
        The division remains in camp in Lookout Valley; position unchanged. The Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry have returned from furlough.
        March 30, the First Brigade of this division made a reconnaissance to McLemore's Cove. Nothing important was obtained, and no engagement.

...


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/2 [S# 58]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO FEBRUARY 29, 1864.--#11

...

        When General Wards brigade, now ordered to the front, shall leave here, there will not be enough troops to guard the railroad between this and Murfreesborough and the supplies at this point. There will then be but four regiments left here--the Thirteenth Wisconsin, Seventy-third Ohio, Eighteenth Michigan, and One hundred and second Ohio; one of them must be sent on the railroad toward Murfreesborough.

...

                                                                                        LOVELL H. ROUSSEAU,
                                                                                                Major-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/1 [S# 72]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 93.--Report of Lieut. Col. Douglas Hapeman, One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry.

                                                                                        HEADQUARTERS 104TH ILLINOIS INFANTRY,
                                                                                        Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864.

CAPTAIN:

        I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry during the campaign in Georgia
        The regiment left Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th day of May, numbering 279 enlisted men, carrying muskets, and 17 commissioned officers. They marched to Tunnel Hill and bivouacked. The 8th they moved in front of Buzzard Roost. On the 9th the regiment was ordered to move across Mill Creek and relieve the Seventy third Ohio, of the Twentieth Corps, stationed on a ridge at the right of the creek, between the creek and mountain, the Eighty-eighth Indiana forming on their left. They remained on this line until the 10th, keeping up a lively skirmish fire at times, without losing any men.

...

                                                                                        DOUGLAS HAPEMAN,
                                                                                                Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                                                        Capt. J. W. FORD,
                                                                                                A. A. A. G., First Brig., First Div., 14th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 217.--Report of Col. Ario Pardee, jr., One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations May 1-August 4.

...

        I can only say that I did not see the fort and do not think my command was within 200 yards of it when I halted, being unable to pass over the numerous lines of troops in my front, of which I had no knowledge at the time of starting, without breaking my line and thus rendering it useless in the charge. Under orders communicated by Lieut. Samuel Goodman, acting assistant inspector-general, First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I withdrew my regiment under cover of the ridge over which we had just passed and there remained until ordered to relieve the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and One hundred and forty-first New York Volunteers, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, posted in front and on the left of the line of our brigade and directly in front of the breast-works of the right of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps.

...

                                                                    ARIO PARDEE,
                                                                            JR., Colonel 147th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Comdg.

                                                                    Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,
                                                                            A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 248.--Reports of Brig. Gen. William T. Ward, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division.

...

        On the 25th day of August I was ordered to withdraw my command at 8 p.m. and march to Turner's Ferry with two brigades, the First Brigade going to the railroad bridge. I withdrew at the appointed time. The roads being full of wagons and troops we did not reach the ferry until daybreak on the 26th instant. I had working parties fortifying the position to be occupied, and one day was sufficient to finish the works, at least so far as was necessary. The enemy did not make his appearance until the 27th instant, when two brigades of French's division with four pieces of artillery came up to feel our lines. They drove in the pickets and opened with their artillery. They did not show themselves in force, keeping a respectful distance from our main line. Captain Smith opened on them with two guns and soon drove away their artillery. The next morning Captain Tebbetts, aide-de-camp, with twenty-five mounted men, made a reconnaissance, but found no enemy. He went to the right as far as Nelson's Ferry, then made a detour, and came into General Williams' lines at the railroad bridge. On the 30th Major Higgins, Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in command of 400 infantry, found the enemy strongly intrenched on Proctor's Creek; demonstrations being made on both his right and left flanks, he prudently withdrew. On September 2 a reconnaissance was made, which resulted in the capture of Atlanta; a report of this has already been forwarded.(*) On the 3d instant that portion of the Second and Third Brigades which was left at Turner's Ferry moved into the city. The First Brigade is still at the railroad bridge on the Chattahoochee. For the information of the major-general commanding, numerical and nominal lists of casualties are appended.(+) Herewith are brigade and regimental reports.
        I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

                                                                                        W. T. WARD,
                                                                                                Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

                                                                                        Lieut. Col. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General, Twentieth Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 261.--Reports of Col. John Coburn, Thirty-third Indiana Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.

...

        On the 28th of August Major Higgins, of the Seventy-third Ohio, made a reconnaissance in front with 300 men and found the enemy intrenched at a distance of three miles. After a short skirmish he returned. A portion of my brigade was with him.

...

                                                                                        J. COBURN,
                                                                                                Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

                                                                                        Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 268.--Report of Col. James Wood, jr., One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.

...

        Major-General Butterfield immediately rode up to the front of the column and, as I understood, had an interview with same major referred to above from Carlin's brigade, and received the same information. Major-General Butterfield, however, ordered me to proceed with the reconnaissance and to feel the enemy. I therefore ordered four companies forward and deployed them as skirmishers, and threw out a line of pickets to protect my right flank. I also ordered the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry to deploy in line of battle and to advance with and to support the skirmishers. The balance of the brigade was placed in position behind the crest of a hill in the front, and to the foot of which the skirmishers were deployed. The ground between the position occupied by the brigade and the valley into which Buzzard Roost Gap debouches toward the west was a series of hills running nearly parallel to the valley. In front of the right of my line, and bounding the valley on the east and the gap on the south, is Rocky Face Mountain, at the foot of which, and running nearly across the west entrance of the gap, where it sweeps round and runs through the gap, is Mill Creek, a stream with soft, muddy banks and bottom, not easily fordable. On the east side of the creek, and leaving but a narrow space between its east bank, is a high bank or bluff, which seems to be a spur of Rocky Face Mountain and with which it is connected, making, however, quite a depression between the highest part of the bluff and the mountain. The distance from this high point of the bluff and mountain in which the depression occurs is perhaps 150 yards.

...

        As soon as the crest was gained the skirmish line at that point was strengthened by three companies from the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Four companies of the Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers held the low ground on the left between the creek and the railroad. On the right two companies from the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry were thrown across the creek, which at that point was deep, and which they crossed on a tree fallen across it, and were deployed as skirmishers and ordered to ascend to the crest which formed the depression between the bluff and Rocky Face Mountain, and which connected the two. This order was executed in a satisfactory manner. The enemy made but a feeble resistance to our advance. The enemy showed no disposition to attack.

...

        I immediately countermanded the order to withdraw the skirmishers, and directed them, as well as the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteer Infantry, to hold the position they then occupied for the night, and that scouts be sent forward from the skirmish line to reconnoiter and obtain, if possible, the information desired by the major-general commanding the Department of the Cumberland. As the enemy kept persistently concealed behind his works, nothing could be discovered, except that his position was very strong, if not impregnable, and that an attempt to dislodge him by a direct attack could not be expected to succeed. As I had done all in my power to comply with the instructions last received, and as night and darkness had now come upon us, the operations of the day closed. The Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry had marched for their camp under the order received from Major-General Butterfield before the last order above set forth had been promulgated. After dark the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry followed, leaving the skirmishers detailed from these regiments in the position they occupied during the day. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, which had been held in reserve in this position first taken up, was permitted to bivouac for the night, as it was amply protected by the Fourteenth Army Corps, being connected with it and covered in front by the pickets of that corps.

...

        I immediately directed the officer in charge of the skirmishers (Major Higgins, of the Seventy-third Ohio) to see that the order was complied with. Subsequently and on the same morning I received orders to continue the reconnaissance commenced the day before. In compliance therewith, I immediately concentrated my brigade in the valley in front of the gap. The skirmishers again took the position from which they were withdrawn the night before, being compelled the second time to drive the enemy's skirmishers therefrom. The One hundred and thirty-sixth New York and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers were deployed in line of battle in front of the bluff. The Fifty-fifth Ohio was ordered to cross the creek and hold the bluff which had been taken by the skirmishers.

...

        The enemy's guns, however, were very soon silenced by some artillery of the Fourteenth Corps. By direction of Major-General Butterfield, I ordered the Thirty-third Massachusetts, which up to this time had been held in reserve, to cross the creek, and, if possible, to gain the crest of Rocky Face Mountain. To cover the operations of the two regiments across the creek the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York were moved to the right and deployed on the west side of the creek in the rear of Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts. While these last-named regiments were engaged in carrying out the order they had received, the skirmishers of the Seventy-third Ohio having gained the crest of the spur, so as to overlook the enemy's works in the gap, and the skirmishers of the Thirty-third Massachusetts having ascended more than half way to the crest of Rocky Face Mountain, I received an order that my brigade would be relieved by Carlin's brigade, of the Fourteenth Corps. After having returned, I marched my brigade to the Presbyterian Church on the road from Woods' Store to Buzzard Roost Gap and encamped. This ended the operations of my brigade in connection with the reconnaissance into Buzzard Roost Gap.

...

        Promptly and regularly the men moved up the hill and drove the enemy from the crest in the most gallant manner. When about two-thirds of the way the left of the line, in passing out the woods into an open space, encountered a galling cross-fire from the left, and which seemed to come from the enemy posted in a piece of woods to the left and in front of me. Not knowing what, if any, disposition had been made to protect our left flank, and fearing a flank movement from the enemy, I changed the front of the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry so as to meet the threatened danger. A few well-directed volleys from this regiment seemed to silence the firing from the woods. Soon afterward I saw troops of the First Division (Brigadier-General Williams) going into position on my left, which removed all fear of a flank attack. I then ordered the Seventy-third Ohio to resume its original front and move forward on a line with the other part of the brigade on the crest of the hill. The hill was divided by an indentation in its top, running in the same direction with the line of battle, in two crests. In my front the crest first reached in a measure overlooked and commanded the second, but my order was to occupy the advanced crest.

...

        I saw no shirking, no unnecessary straggling. The wounded, those who were able, took care of themselves, and those who were not lay upon the ground until they were removed by the ambulances. My thanks are especially due to Lieutenant-Colonel Faulkner, of One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, and to Major Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio, for the distinguished gallantry exhibited by them in this engagement, and for the marked skill and ability with which they handled their respective commands.

...

        On the 19th, in the morning, I was ordered with my brigade to make a reconnaissance toward Two-Run Creek. My instructions were to march due south until I struck the creek. I deployed one regiment, the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and threw out skirmishers in advance. The balance of the regiment [brigade] was formed in two columns on the right and left of the regiment deployed. In this formation the brigade advanced. When within about half a mile from the creek, it was discovered that the enemy in force was in dangerous proximity on our left flank. Being isolated from the corps to which the brigade belonged, and not being supported on the right by the Second Division and on the left by the First Division, as it was understood we would be, and being unable to make connection with either of these divisions, although they were ordered to march at the same time with our division, it became necessary to withdraw the reconnaissance and take up a defensive position until supported by the two divisions above referred to.

...

        The Twentieth Corps was ordered to make an attack and drive the enemy away. This brigade was first ordered to support the First Division (General Williams) in the attack, and to that end was formed in line of battle by battalion in mass, with direction to take deploying intervals as it advanced. Before I had advanced far I was ordered to move my brigade to the east side of the road and move to the attack, connecting with Williams' left. As soon as two regiments had crossed--the Fifty-fifth Ohio and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York in the front line, and the Seventy-third Ohio and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin in the second line--I was ordered to advance, keeping the road on my right. On communicating to Major-General Butterfield the fact that the Thirty-third Massachusetts, forming a part of my first line, had not crossed the road, he directed me to place it behind the line in reserve. As I was advancing in this position the enemy opened a sharp musketry fire on my left flank. As the fire developed a considerable force on my flank, I faced the Thirty-third Massachusetts in the direction of the fire and changed the front of the Seventy-third Ohio in the same direction, and advanced on that position of the enemy. In this way I advanced as long as it was light enough to see, swinging round my left so as not to lose connection with the other regiments of the brigade. A deep ravine, a creek, and a morass separated me from the forces that attacked my left. My left advanced to this ravine and creek, and my right and center as far as First Division advanced. With the close of the day a rain-storm and intense darkness set in, which put a stop to operations on both sides. I held the position to which we were advanced until 12 o'clock at night, when, in pursuance of orders from division headquarters, I marched the brigade back on the road to the rear of the First Division and bivouacked for the night. On the 27th of May my brigade was moved to the extreme right and rear of the corps and bivouacked in column by battalion, and on the 28th relieved General Ward's brigade, of this division, in the front line; intrenched on the extreme right of the Twentieth Army Corps, where it remained until the 1st of June.

...

        On the 21st of June I received orders from Major-General Butterfield to make a reconnaissance with two regiments to the right, in front of our position. I accordingly ordered the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York and Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Faulkner, to make the reconnaissance as ordered. I subsequently re-enforced him with the Seventy-third Ohio. The troops left camp at 11 a.m. and returned at 6 p.m., having accomplished the object of the reconnaissance. The enemy occupied the position on the crest of a hill about 500 yards in our front. I was ordered with my brigade to drive off the enemy and occupy this hill.

...

        As soon as the skirmishers  were deployed they advanced and took possession of the front hill or ridge. Behind them and on the flat or bottom land the division was deployed into line of battle, the First Brigade on the right, connecting with Geary's division, the Second Brigade in the center, and the Third Brigade on the left, connecting with Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps. The first formation of the brigade was three regiments in front, viz, the Seventy-third Ohio, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, and Twentieth Connecticut, in the order named from right to left. Thus formed, the brigade took position immediately in rear of and at the foot of the first bluff or ridge above alluded to, by which it was entirely covered. The One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, it will be remembered, was on the right, to which place it was ordered to act as skirmishers. As soon as the brigade and division were in position at the foot of the ridge, inasmuch as the skirmishers of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers were not in front of the brigade to which it belonged, I requested that that regiment might be relieved from the First Brigade. This was not effected until after the engagement which subsequently occurred; consequently, only the skirmishers of that regiment took part in it. After the formation of the brigade as above stated, I was ordered to put another regiment in reserve or in the second line, so that the brigade line of battle would be only two regiments front. I ordered the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry to take a position in rear of the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, and connect on the left with the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, also in reserve. After this formation was made, orders were received to have the men stack arms and make themselves as comfortable as possible; that a farther advance was not at that time necessary.

...

        A well directed and murderous volley from the Twentieth Connecticut poured into this column threw it into confusion, and it broke and fled. As there seemed to be some indication that the troops of the Fourth Corps, on our immediate left, were being driven by the enemy, I held the Fifty-fifth Ohio and Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry in reserve to protect my left flank, in case it should be exposed. Happily, the brigade on my left held its ground and repulsed the enemy. As soon as I became satisfied that my flank would not be turned, I ordered forward the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers to relieve the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, which was nearly exhausted by the extreme heat of the day and the severe fighting. The men had expended all their ammunition and supplied themselves from the cartridge-boxes of the dead and wounded rebels. On being relieved, the regiment fell back about fifty yards to the rear, where it took position in line of battle, ready to spring to their guns in case of necessity. I ordered the Fifty-fifth Ohio to re-enforce the line on the left, as there was a gap on the left of the Twentieth Connecticut, between it and the right of the Fourth Corps.

...

                                                            JAMES WOOD,
                                                                        JR., Colonel, Comdg. Third Brigade, Third Division, 20th Corps.

                                                            Capt. ROBERT E. BEECHER,
                                                                        Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 270.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry.

...

        About 1 p.m. the regiments of this brigade were deployed in line of battle in the following order, with two regiments in front: In the front line, on the right the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, on the left the Twentieth Connecticut; in the second line the Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Regiments, the Twentieth being thus placed in the front line on the extreme left of the division and corps and adjoining the Fourth Corps. The First Division occupied the right of the Twentieth Corps, the Second Division the center, and the Third Division the left. In the Third Division the First Brigade occupied the right, the Second the center, and the Third the left.

...

                                                                        PHILO B. BUCKINGHAM,
                                                                                    Lieut. Col., Comdg. Twentieth Regt. Connecticut Vol. Infty.

                                                                        Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
                                                                                    A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 276.--Report of Lieut. Col. Frederick C. Winkler, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry.

...

        Shortly after 8 a.m. May 25 we started from Burnt Hickory and marched southward, crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, and continued our march through a very rough country, hills and woods. Near New Hope Church we came upon our Second Division, who had intrenched themselves. Dispositions for battle were made, and about 4 p.m. our brigade moved forward on the extreme left of the line, the Twenty-sixth being in second line. We moved forward with but little opposition nearly a mile, then came to a ravine which was commanded by an opposite hill, which the rebels held in force with infantry and artillery. The brigade was still pressed forward, and here a very severe conflict ensued. The rebels fire was very rapid and, owing to their advantageous position, far more effective than ours. The Seventy-third Ohio, in the front line to our left, being very hotly pressed, we moved to its support and soon after relieved it and took our place in the front line. The battle continued with great fierceness for about an hour longer, when, as darkness set in, both parties ceased firing. We held that position till after midnight, when we were taken to the rear.

...

        For a time the conflict was desperate. I took every man who could be spared on the right to re-enforce the left. At last the enemy broke and fled. We pursued him on his very heels to the top of the hill, captured the regimental flag of the Thirty-third Mississippi, and leaving Colonel Drake, of that regiment, and 34 others dead, and at least double that number severely wounded, behind us, and cutting off the retreat of forty others, who surrendered afterward to the second line. Arriving on the top of the hill, we were again met by a heavy volley from the woods on our left, to which we replied with vigor. After some fifteen minutes the Twentieth Connecticut came up and took position on our left, and some time after the Seventy-third Ohio came up to take our place, and we were permitted to go some forty yards to the rear. Our ammunition had been entirely expended, and during the last half hour we had used that of the killed and wounded rebels lying on the field. The intense heat of the sun, added to the heat of the contest, had utterly exhausted the men, and when the excitement was over quite a number fell into a swoon. We secured besides the flag 5 officers' swords of the Thirty-third Mississippi. This regiment, we ascertained from the wounded, numbered nearly 400 effective men.

...

                                                                                FRED. C. WlNKLER,
                                                                                        Lieut. Col., Comdg. Twenty-sixth Regt. Wis. Vol. Infty.

                                                                                Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
                                                                                        A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 44.--Reports of Col. Daniel Dustin, One hundred and fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Division.

...

        The wagon train was a most unwieldy thing, and under so many untoward circumstances the quartermaster of the expedition, Captain Summers, deserves great credit for his untiring industry in the execution of his arduous duties, and for the success that attended his exertions. Lieutenant-Colonel Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, deserves much commendation for the efficient and diligent performance of his difficult duties as general field officer during the entire expedition.
        I respectfully suggest that hereafter these expeditions should not be encumbered with more than 400 wagons, and that measures be taken to prevent an increase of this number by a thorough organization of the train on the day before starting.
        Respectfully submitted.

                                                                    DANL. DUSTIN,
                                                                                Colonel, Commanding Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps.

                                                                    Lieut. Col. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#2

...

V. The One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteers is hereby assigned to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and will relieve the One hundred and seventy-third Ohio Volunteers from duty with Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Upon being relieved, the One hundred and seventy-third Ohio Infantry will report to Major-General Rousseau for assignment to duty in that division.

* * * * * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Thomas:

                                                                                        HENRY M. CIST,
                                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 4.--Itinerary of the Union Forces, January 1-June 30, 1865.

...

        April 10.--Again started on the campaign ending with the war at Raleigh, N. C. From thence the division marched on their homeward journey, passing through Richmond, Va., and Washington, D.C., at which last place the following regiments were mustered out of service: One hundred and second, One hundred and fifth, One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois; Seventieth and Eighty-fifth Indiana; Seventy-ninth Ohio; Nineteenth Michigan; Thirty-third Massachusetts; Twen-ty-second and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin; Twentieth Connecticut, and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, the Thirty-third Indiana, Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Veteran Regiments being transferred to Fourteenth Army Corps. The last regiment mustered out [was] the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, closing the records of this division June 14.

...

        June 4.--The Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry were transferred to the Fourteenth Army Corps by Special Orders, No. 84, headquarters Army of Georgia, dated near Washington, D.C

...


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 200.--Report of Capt. George H. Eldridge, One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations January 16-March 24.

...

        On the 1st of February this regiment, with the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was engaged in corduroying and repairing the road to Sister's Ferry. On the 2d of February we again broke camp, and, with the brigade, marched through Lawtonville in the direction of Barnwell Court-House. On the 6th the column turned in the direction of Branchville, crossing the Salkehatchie River, striking the Charleston and Augusta Railroad at Graham's Turnout on the 7th. This regiment, with the brigade, was employed all of the 8th in destroying railroad track in the vicinity of Graham's. On the 9th the regiment, with the brigade, marched to Blackville, and were busily employed during the 9th and 10th in tearing up track between Blackville and White Pond Station. From White Pond we marched to the South Edisto, which we were unable to cross until the morning of the 12th, the enemy having destroyed the bridge.

...

                                                                            G. H. ELDRIDGE,
                                                                                    Captain, Commanding 136th New York Volunteer Infantry.

                                                                            Capt. H. G. H. TARR,
                                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LII/1 [S# 109]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Southwestern Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, West Florida, And Northern Georgia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#14

...

        Three companies of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, under the command of Major Arnold, are stationed at Tantalon; four companies of the same regiment, commanded by Colonel Wood, at Anderson; two companies of the same regiment between Anderson and Stevenson, commanded respectively by Captains Bushwalter [sic.] and Farron [sic.]; two regiments and nine companies, under the command of Colonel Smith, are stationed at Stevenson. Of this detachment, three companies of the Thirty-third Massachusetts, Seventy-third Ohio, and Fifty-fifth Ohio, one of each, are posted to the west of Stevenson. One company, Thirty-third Massachusetts, is stationed at Widow's Creek. The remainder of the corps, First Brigade, Second Division, and the Third Division at Bridgeport, with one regiment on Long Island and one on the other side of the Tennessee River. I beg leave to state that the above disposition was made prior to the receipt of the order changing the dividing line between the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps, which will necessarily cause some alteration.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                                                        O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                                                Major-General, Commanding.